How to find and compare gas and electricity quotes

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An estimate of how much your energy will cost is one of the first things you should do when shopping around for a new energy supplier. Gas and electricity quotes give you an idea of how much your new supplier will charge you for your fuel. It is important to understand these quotes when setting up gas and electricity in a new home. When you receive these quotes, you can then compare these figures with your current energy payment.

Last updated: March 2021

Gas and electricity quotes and estimates

Gas and electricity quotes

If you’re not familiar with gas and electricity pricing, these quotes can be confusing especially when setting up gas and electricity in a new home. Most energy companies will give you a variety of prices including p/kWh and daily standing charge. You may also see a number of other potential charges on your gas and electricity quotes. Understanding exactly what all of these numbers and fees mean will help you find the supplier and the tariff, that’s right for you.Also, if you are confused, do not hesitate to call us. At Switch Plan, we have experts that will get quotes for you and find an energy plan that caters to your specific needs. All you have to do is give them a call at the number above.

How to get a gas and electricity quote from an energy supplier?

Before they give you a quote for your gas and electricity, most energy suppliers ask you to provide a few pieces of information. This is because the amount you’ll pay for your gas and electricity will vary depending on a number of factors including your location and your energy consumption.
In most cases, you’ll need to provide:

  1. Your post code
  2. Your average energy consumption
  3. The size of your property
  4. The type of energy tariff you’re currently on (e.g. Economy 7, standard, prepayment)


You may also need to tell your new potential supplier:

  • Which energy company currently supplies your property
  • How you intend to pay for your gas and electricity (e.g. direct debit, payment on receipt)

Once you’ve provided all of this information, you’ll be presented with a choice of quotes. The number of quotes you have to choose from will vary by supplier. While some energy companies only offer one or two tariffs, others have five, ten or twenty different options.
Working your way through all these different quotes, and comparing the different prices on offer, can take time, especially if you’re not entirely sure what you’re looking for. If you’d rather leave it to the experts, our Switch Plan can help you find the tariff that’s right for you. Get in touch today to find out more.
0330 054 0017

Estimated energy use figures for gas and electricity quotes

When getting a quote, you’ll be asked to provide estimated energy use figures. This tells your potential gas and electricity supplier how much energy you currently consume. This is important as a lot of suppliers offer specific tariffs for high or low energy use customers.
If you’re not sure how much energy your household consumes, the easiest way to find out is to check your most recent energy bill. This should tell you exactly how much energy you used in the last month. If you don’t have a bill handy, you can estimate the amount of electricity or gas you consume based on average usage of similar properties.

Average gas consumption of small/medium/big houses

Most homes in the UK use gas to power their central heating. The larger a property is, the more radiators it’s likely to have and the more gas it’s probably going to use. While estimating energy usage isn’t always easy – after all, some people like to keep their homes at tropical temperatures while others prefer to have the thermostat just above freezing – you can look at the average usage of similar sized properties to see how much you might be using.
The table below shows the average use of low, medium and high consumption households:

Consumption rate Usage (in kWh)
Low 8,000
Medium 12,000
High 17,000

In general, 1-2 bed properties are considered low usage homes, 3-4 bed houses are medium consumption and properties with 5+ bedrooms are high use. However, well-insulated properties are likely to use a lot less gas than poorly insulated homes. Households can also reduce the amount of gas they consume by investing in an efficient boiler and central heating system.

COVID-19

More than ever, our team of experts remain on deck to help you make savings on your energy. We understand how deeply the lives of many are affected by these trying times and we want to support you the best we can. More on your energy supply during COVID-19 in our article.

Average electricity consumption of small/medium/big houses

Electricity consumption can also vary significantly between homes. While some households have energy-saving lights, turn appliances off at the plug and minimise the number of electricity-sapping gadgets they use, others don’t put any limits on their energy consumption.
Like gas, electricity use tends to be higher in larger homes. Bigger properties have more light bulbs, more appliances and – generally – more residents. As a result, electricity bills for large 4-5 bed properties are a lot more than those for small 1- 2 bed homes.
The table below shows average electricity consumption for low, medium and high use homes.

Consumption rate Usage (in kWh)
Low 1,800kWh
Medium 2,900kWh
High 4,300kWh

Again, low usage homes are generally 1-2 bed properties, medium usage homes are usually 3-4 bed and high usage buildings normally have 5 or more bedrooms.

What affects the cost of your energy bill?

There are a lot of factors that affect the cost of your energy. Some of the most influential are:

  • Wholesale energy prices
  • Supply and demand
  • Transport costs
  • Infrastructure maintenance
  • Availability
  • Your region

If you opt for a fixed rate tariff, these variables won’t change the amount you pay once your tariff is up and running. Your gas bill shouldn’t be affected by changes in the price of fuel or by other external factors. Instead, you’ll fix the amount you pay with your energy supplier at the start of your contract and this will stay the same until the fixed period comes to an end.
If you choose a variable rate however, these factors will continue to impact on your energy bill. This could see the cost of your gas and electricity fluctuate every month.
Although there are a lot of things you can’t influence when it comes to your energy bill, there are some that you can control. These include your:

  1. Energy tariff
  2. Energy consumption
  3. Chosen payment method


For example, the amount of energy you consume will have a big impact on your monthly bill. Working to reduce how much gas and electricity you use will help you cut your energy bill.

How to cut your gas and electricity bill?

The tariff you choose will also affect how much you pay for your energy. While some tariffs offer cheap rates and affordable standing charges, others ask you to pay over the odds for your energy. Shopping around for a better deal can help you to shave a significant amount off of your monthly bill.

Last but definitely not least, your chosen payment method can have a surprisingly large impact on how much you pay. This is because energy companies prefer customers to pay by Direct Debit and so offer financial incentives to encourage them to do so. If you don’t currently pay by Direct Debit, switching to the payment method could see you earn annual discounts on your energy bill.
Compare gas and electricity quotes

How to switch?

Putting your details into a number of different energy sites can be tiring and confusing. Instead of comparing prices manually, use an impartial comparison tool to find the tariff that’s right for you. Our Switch Plan can help you find the right supplier and the right deal, it can also take care of the switching process for you.

Deciphering your gas and electricity quote

Gas and electricity quotes can be complicated. Providers will often list a range of charges and fees and a lot of suppliers give their tariffs strange names or descriptions. Working out exactly what you’re being offered is essential if you’re going to choose the deal that’s right for you.

Additionally, if this is your first home , you might be unaware of some of the conditions relating to gas and electricity quotes for first time buyers. The hyperlink above will take you to our related article catering specifically to new homeowners.

kWh electricity price

One of the most important numbers you’ll see on your quote is the kWh electricity price. This is the amount in pence that you’ll be charged for every kWh of electricity you use.
The letters kWh stand for kilowatt hour. This is the amount of energy a 1000W appliance would use if it were left on for 60 minutes. So if you have a 1000W electric radiator, that’s the amount you’d pay if you switched it on for one hour. If you have an appliance that only uses 500W however, it would take two hours for it to consume 1 kWh of energy.
The kWh price should be listed clearly on your electricity quote. However in some cases, you may need to look at the small print to find out exactly how much you’ll be charged.
If you choose a fixed rate tariff, the kWh price will stay the same for the duration of your contract. However, if you opt for a variable rate deal, it can go up and down every month.
If you choose an Economy 7 tariff, you’ll see two kWh prices listed for your electricity. One will represent the amount you’ll pay during the day, and the other will be the cheaper rate you’ll pay for seven hours at night.
At the moment, the average cost of a kWh of electricity in the UK is around 15p.

kWh gas price

Like electricity, gas prices are quoted in terms of kWh. This should also be clearly displayed on your energy quote. You’ll notice that gas is a lot cheaper than electricity. On average you’ll pay between 3-4p for every kWh of gas you use. However, as households generally use a lot more gas than electricity, the total cost of your gas and electricity consumption will probably be about the same.

Standing daily charge

Another figure you’ll see on your gas and electricity quote is a standing charge. This is the amount you have to pay your energy provider for connecting you to the grid. You have to pay this fee every single day, even on days when you don’t use any gas or electricity. You’ll have to pay one standing charge for your gas and another for your electricity. This normally adds up to around 60p per day.

Would you like to know more about setting up gas and electricity in a new home? Great! Check out these related articles.

  1. Set up gas and electricity
  2. Sign up for gas and electricity
  3. Electrical safety
  4. Gas safety
  5. Grid connect
  6. Find my supplier

Call us to switch your energy supplier for free!

0330 054 0017

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Written by julien

Updated on 8 Apr, 2021

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